Georgia Brothers Arrested for Assaulting Law Enforcement During January 6 Attack
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Georgia Brothers Arrested for Assaulting Law Enforcement During January 6 Attack

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 Two Georgia brothers have been arrested for assaulting law enforcement officers during the January 6, 2021, breach of the U.S. Capitol.

Cepane Sarty, 38, of Marietta, and Seth Sarty, 45, of Rockmart, are charged with the felony offense of assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers during the attack, which disrupted a joint session of Congress to count the electoral votes in the 2020 presidential election.

In addition, the men faced misdemeanor charges of knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful authority, disorderly conduct in a restricted building, engaging in physical violence in a restricted building, and parading, demonstrating or picketing inside the Capitol.

According to court documents, the brothers entered the Capitol building via the Senate Wing Door at about 2:20 p.m., less than 10 minutes after the initial breach in the area. They then made their way to the Crypt and toward the Memorial Door, joining a group of rioters confronting a police line.

By 2:32 p.m., the group had broken through the police line and gained access to the House side of the building.

The men then entered the office suite of then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Next, they entered the Capitol Rotunda briefly before exiting the building, only to return shortly after 3 p.m. At that point, they encountered a police line attempting to clear the area.

Body-worn camera and closed-circuit television footage showed the brothers shoving police officers and temporarily driving them back. Police then deployed a chemical riot control agent at the men, causing them to leave the Capitol through the Rotunda doors at 3:13 p.m.

The Sarty brothers were arrested on Monday in Georgia.

Since the Jan. 6 breach of the Capitol, more than 1,300 people have been charged in nearly all 50 states in connection with the incident. More than 450 have been charged with the felony of assaulting or impeding law enforcement.

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